A group of women, dressed in period costume, sit in a plush living room

A WOMAN OF NO IMPORTANCE

Mon 7 - Sat 12 October 2019
Tickets £20-£40*

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An earnest young American woman, a louche English lord and an innocent young chap join a house party of fin de siècle fools and grotesques. Nearby a woman lives, cradling a long-buried secret. In A Woman of No Importance, Oscar Wilde’s marriage of glittering wit and Ibsenite drama created a vivid new theatrical voice.

A Woman of No Importance was the first production in Classic Spring’s celebrated Wilde season in the West End, and is the first to tour the UK. Directed by Classic Spring’s Artistic Director Dominic Dromgoole, and starring national treasure Liza Goddard (Bergerac, Doctor Who) along with the much-loved Roy Hudd (Broadchuch, Huddlines), Isla Blair (House of Cards, Johnny English Reborn), Emma Amos (Goodnight Sweetheart, Sweet Bird of Youth) and Katy Stephens (As You Like It, Anthony and Cleopatra), this incredible production is sure to provoke laughter and tears wherever it goes.

Running Time

TBC

Tickets

Monday - Saturday, 7.45pm
and Saturday, 2.30pm: £20/£30/£35/£40*
Thursday, 2.30pm: £20/£30/£35*

*All ticket prices include a £3 per-ticket booking fee.

Liza Goddard
Liza Goddard

Stage credits include Lady Windermere’s Fan, An Ideal Husband and Alan Ayckbourn’s Season’s Greetings. Her television work includes cult classics Doctor Who and Bergerac.

Roy Hudd
Roy Hudd

Credits includes ITV’s Broadchurch, Huddlines on the BBC, as well as the West End hit When We Are Married.  

Isla Blair
Isla Blair

Credits include House of Cards, Johnny English Reborn and Made in Dagenham. 

Emma Amos
Emma Amos

Previous roles have taken Amos from television to stage, starring in Goodnight Sweetheart on the BBC and Sweet Bird of Youth in Chichester. 

Katy Stephens
Katy Stephens

Stage credits included Rosalind in As You Like It and the title role in Antony and Cleopatra for the Royal Shakespeare Company. 

  • 'Effortless wit, wisdom and waspishness'

    THE TIMES
  • 'Wonderfully moving, sublimely funny'

    THE INDEPENDENT